COVID-19 Updates

Finish Strong Protocols[3874]


Click here for the Latest News Releases

Click here for the latest Information and CDC Guidance for COVID-19

To keep the public informed, the Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders are providing regular updates in government services and pertinent links regarding COVID-19. Coronavirus is a serious illness that spreads from person to person. Cape May County officials are working closely with the State and Federal Government to provide the latest information to help mitigate the spread of this virus.

Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton and Freeholder Jeffrey L. Pierson, who oversees the Cape May County Department of Health want to assure everyone that the County is closely monitoring the spread of COVID-19 in Cape May County and throughout the region. Their foremost goal is to protect the well-being of our employees and families as well as our residents and visitors and continue to provide essential services to our County.

County government will continue to operate, and all government functions will be offered with some adjustments including limited hours of operation and reduced services. Communications remain open and the public is encouraged to call or email for needed services or information.

We are all working together to keep you informed and safe.

Gerald M. Thornton, Freeholder Director
Jeffrey L. Pierson, Freeholder, liaison, Health and Human Services.


Governor Philip D. Murphy 

Executive Orders Regarding COVID-19

Administrative Orders Regarding COVID-19


The Board of Chosen Freeholders have passed resolutions regarding COVID-19, click here to view the resolutions.



covid testing flyer


COVID-19 Update 11/24/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 62 new positive cases among County residents. Currently, 1732 County residents are now off quarantine.  Additionally, there are 2 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

Sadly, today we are announcing the passing of a 72-year-old male from Middle Township and a 98-year-old male from Ocean City, “My deepest condolences to the families and friends of the two departed,” said Cape May County Freeholder Jeff Pierson. 

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2596 including 102 deaths. 

11.24.20 covid grpahs

Holiday celebrations

Holiday celebrations will likely need to be different this year to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Avoid activities that are higher risk for spread. Consider fun alternatives that pose lower risk of spreading COVID-19.

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is a time when many families travel long distances to celebrate together. Travel increases the chance of getting and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. If you must travel, be informed of the risks involved.

Lower risk activities

  • Having a small dinner with only people who live in your household
  • Preparing traditional family recipes for family and neighbors, especially those at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and delivering them in a way that doesn’t involve contact with others
  • Having a virtual dinner and sharing recipes with friends and family
  • Shopping online rather than in person on the day after Thanksgiving or the next Monday
  • Watching sports events, parades, and movies from home

Moderate risk activities

  • Having a small outdoor dinnerwith family and friends who live in your community 
  • Visiting pumpkin patches or orchards where people use hand sanitizer before touching pumpkins or picking apples, wearing masks is encouraged or enforced, and people are able to maintain social distancing
  • Attending a small outdoor sports events with safety precautions in place

Higher risk activities

Avoid these higher risk activities to help prevent the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19:

  • Going shopping in crowded stores just before, on, or after Thanksgiving
  • Participating or being a spectator at a crowded race
  • Attending crowded parades
  • Attending large indoor gatherings with people from outside of your household
  • Using alcohol or drugs that may alter judgment and make it more difficult to practice COVID-19 safety measures.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Updates 11/23/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 35 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1684 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2534 including 100 deaths. 

**The daily reported total number of positive cases includes results from specimens collected on several dates.

11.23.20 covid graphs

Before You Travel

Before you travel, consider the following:

  • Is COVID-19 spreading at your destination?
     The more cases at your destination, the more likely you are to get infected during travel and spread the virus to others when you return.
  • Check Each State’s Cases in the Last 7 Days
  • Travel Recommendations for Destinations Around the World
  • Do you live with someone who might be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19?
    If you get infected while traveling, you can spread the virus to loved ones when you return, even if you don’t have symptoms
  • Are you at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19?
     
    Anyone can get very ill from the virus that causes COVID-19, but older adults and people of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Does your destination have requirements or restrictions for travelers?
    Some state, local, and territorial governments have requirements, such as requiring people to wear masks and requiring those who recently traveled to stay home for up to 14 days. Check state, territorial, tribal and local public health websites for information before you travel. If you are traveling internationally, check the destination’s Office of Foreign Affairs or Ministry of Health or the US Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Country Information for details about entry requirements and restrictions for arriving travelers, such as mandatory testing or quarantine.

If You Travel

During your trip, take steps to protect yourself and others from COVID-19:

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Updates 11/22/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 43 new positive cases among County residents.   Currently, 1641 County residents are now off quarantine.   Additionally, there are 2 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2499 including 100 deaths. 

**The daily reported total number of positive cases includes results from specimens collected on several dates.


 11.22.20 covid graphs


Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/21/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 43 new positive cases among County residents.   Currently, 1604 County residents are now off quarantine.   

Sadly, today we are announcing the passing of a 64-year-old female from Middle Township, “Wishing the family peace and comfort during this hard time,” said Cape May County Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2456 including 100 deaths. 

**The daily reported total number of positive cases includes results from specimens collected on several dates.

11.21.20 covid graphs

How COVID-19 Vaccines Work

COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection, but with all types of vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory” T-lymphocytes as well as B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus in the future.

It typically takes a few weeks for the body to produce T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes after vaccination. Therefore, it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to provide protection.

Sometimes after vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity.

Types of Vaccines

Currently, there are three main types of COVID-19 vaccines that are undergoing large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials in the United States. Below is a description of how each type of vaccine prompts our bodies to recognize and protect us from the virus that causes COVID-19. None of these vaccines can give you COVID-19.

  • mRNA vaccines contain material from the virus that causes COVID-19 that gives our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus. After our cells make copies of the protein, they destroy the genetic material from the vaccine. Our bodies recognize that the protein should not be there and build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are infected in the future.
  • Protein subunit vaccines include harmless pieces (proteins) of the virus that cause COVID-19 instead of the entire germ. Once vaccinated, our immune system recognizes that the proteins don’t belong in the body and begins making T-lymphocytes and antibodies. If we are ever infected in the future, memory cells will recognize and fight the virus.
  • Vector vaccines contain a weakened version of a live virus—a different virus than the one that causes COVID-19—that has genetic material from the virus that causes COVID-19 inserted in it (this is called a viral vector). Once the viral vector is inside our cells, the genetic material gives cells instructions to make a protein that is unique to the virus that causes COVID-19. Using these instructions, our cells make copies of the protein. This prompts our bodies to build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus if we are infected in the future.

Most COVID-19 Vaccines Require More Than One Shot

All but one of the COVID-19 vaccines that are currently in Phase 3 clinical trials in the United States use two shots. The first shot starts building protection. A second shot a few weeks later is needed to get the most protection the vaccine has to offer. One vaccine in Phase 3 clinical trials only needs one shot.

The Bottom Line

Getting vaccinated is one of many steps you can take to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.  Protection from COVID-19 is critically important because for some people, it can cause severe illness or death.

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. Other steps, like masks and social distancing, help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus or spreading it to others. Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/20/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 66 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1581 County residents are now off quarantine.  Additionally, there is 1 new out of county positive case that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2413 including 99 deaths. 

**The daily reported total number of positive cases includes results from specimens collected on several dates.

 11.20.20 covid graphs

How can people safely get together? What are the limits for indoor and outdoor gatherings?

Attending a gathering, ceremony, or celebration is permitted as long as the event complies with the following limits on gatherings.

Gatherings are allowed, but different limits apply depending on the type of gathering, and where it is happening:

Indoor Gatherings

    General indoor gatherings must be limited to 10 people or 25% of a room's capacity -- whichever number is lower. All attendees at indoor gatherings must wear face coverings and stay six feet apart.

    Indoor gatherings for weddings, funerals, or memorial services must be limited to 150 people or 25% of a room's capacity -- whichever number is lower.

    Indoor gatherings for religious and political activities protected under the First Amendment must be limited to 150 people or 25% of a room's capacity -- whichever number is lower.

    Indoor gatherings for entertainment centers where performances are viewed or given, including movie theaters, performing arts centers, and other concert venues, must be limited to 150 people or 25% of a room's capacity -- whichever number is lower.

    Legislative and judicial proceedings are not subject to the limits on indoor gatherings.

Outdoor Gatherings

    General outdoor gatherings must be limited to 500 people and social distancing must be practiced. Effective November 23rd, general outdoor gatherings must be limited to 150 people.

    There is no limit for outdoor gatherings for religious or political activities protected under the First Amendment.

To save lives and stop the spread of COVID-19, wear a mask, wash your hands, practice social distancing, and stay home if you are sick.

Face coverings are required in indoor public spaces and in outdoor public spaces when social distancing is difficult to maintain.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/19/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 65 new positive cases among County residents. Currently, 1553 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2347 including 99 deaths. 

**The daily reported total number of positive cases includes results from specimens collected on several dates.

11.19.20 covid graphs

SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) is transmitted predominately by respiratory droplets generated when people cough, sneeze, sing, talk, or breathe. CDC recommends community use of masks, specifically non-valved multi-layer cloth masks, to prevent transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Experimental and epidemiological data support community masking to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2. 

Masks are primarily intended as "source control" to reduce the emission of virus-laden droplets. This is especially relevant for asymptomatic or presymptomatic individuals who feel well and may be unaware they are infectious. These cases are estimated to account for more than 50% of transmissions. Masks also help provide personal protection for the wearer by reducing the likelihood of inhaling infectious droplets. The community benefit of masking for SARS-CoV-2 control is due to the combination of these effects. As the number of people using masks consistently and correctly increases, so does the individual prevention benefit.

Wear your Mask Correctly

  • Wash your hands before putting on your mask
  • Put it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin
  • Try to fit it snugly against the sides of your face
  • Make sure you can breathe easily
  • CDC does not recommend use of masks or cloth masks for source control if they have an exhalation valve or vent

Wear a Mask to Protect Others

  • Wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth to help protect others in case you’re infected with COVID-19 but don’t have symptoms
  • Wear a mask in public settings when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when it may be difficult for you to stay six feet apart
  • Wear a mask correctly for maximum protection
  • Don’t put the mask around your neck or up on your forehead
  • Don’t touch the mask, and, if you do, wash your hands or use hand sanitizer to disinfect

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/18/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 51 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1532 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2282 including 99 deaths. 

**The daily reported total number of positive cases includes results from specimens collected on several dates.




11.18.20 covid graphs

covid testing


Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/17/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 45 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1505 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2231 including 99 deaths. 

**The daily reported total number of positive cases includes results from specimens collected on several dates.

11.17.20 covid graphs

In response to COVID-19, Cape May County Department of Health with the partnership of Cape Regional Medical Center and Cape May County/Local Office of Emergency Management will be expanding testing throughout Cape May County. Testing will be available at Cape May County Department of Health and at various locations around Cape May County. Testing will be by appointment. To make an appointment you can call (609) 463-6581. 

“Cape May County understands the importance of making COVID-19 testing readily available for its residents. To increase access to testing for our at-risk population, and first responders a mobile testing unit will be coming to a town by you. Testing will also be performed at Cape May County Department of Health. Help us protect our community by getting tested,” said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer. 

It is especially important to get tested if:

  • You are experiencing symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, sore throat, muscle pain, shivering, headache, or new loss of taste or smell)
  • You have been in close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19
  • You are an essential worker (health care worker, first responder, food service worker, or transit worker)
  • You were recently in a large crowd where social distancing was hard to maintain
  • You recently traveled to an area or a state with high COVID-19 infection rates
  • If your considered high risk due to underlying health conditions

 

Testing will be conducted at the Cape May County Department of Health on Mondays and Wednesdays, except on holidays. A mobile testing unit will be out in the community on Tuesdays and Thursdays, except on holidays. Individual’s insurance will be billed if applicable. If an individual does not have insurance, the cost will be covered. The testing will be done by appointment. All Center for Disease and Control and New Jersey Department of Health guidance will be followed to assure the safety of staff and participants. 

 

For additional information and list of testing locations call (609) 463-6581. For the most up to date information follow Cape May County Department of Health on Facebook and visit www.cmchealth.net. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov.


COVID-19 Update 11/16/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 42 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1485 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2186 including 99 deaths. 

**The daily reported total number of positive cases includes results from specimens collected on several dates.

11.16.20 covid grahs

What to Expect at Outdoor Restaurants and Bars

Establishments must institute the following policies:

  • Limit seating to a maximum of 8 customers per table - unless from an immediate family or the same household – and arrange seating to achieve a minimum distance of 6 feet between parties;
  • Encourage reservations for greater control of customer traffic;
  • Cordon off any indoor or outdoor dance floors to the public;
  • Require customers to provide a phone number if making a reservation to facilitate contact tracing;
  • Consider alternatives to paper/physical menus (whiteboards, electronic menus);
  • Provide a hand sanitizer station for customers; and
  • Require customers who wish to enter the indoor portion of the establishment to wear a face covering, unless the customer has a medical reason for not doing so or is a child under two years of age;
  • Require that groups stay 6 feet apart, even in areas where groups are not assigned seating;
  • Adhere to all other health and safety protocols in DOH Executive Directive No. 20-019.

Note: Areas with a fixed roof, if two sides are open, comprising over 50% of their total wall space, may operate under rules for outdoor dining under Executive Order No. 163.

Effective Thursday, November 12, individual, fully enclosed dining bubbles – limited to one group of diners each and thoroughly cleaned and sanitized between uses – may be set-up for outside use.

What to Expect at Indoor Restaurants and Bars

The following summarizes some of the protocols contained in DOH's Health and Safety Standards for Indoor DiningEO 183EO 192, and EO 194. However, this summary is not a replacement for fully complying with the terms of the health and safety standards , EO 183EO 192, and EO 194, and businesses should read the full guidance carefully to ensure full compliance.
 Food and beverage establishments must:

  • Limit the number of patrons in indoor areas to 25 percent of the food or beverage establishment's indoor capacity, excluding the food or beverage establishment's employees;
  • Limit seating to a maximum of eight (8) customers per table (unless they are from a family from the same household) and arrange seating to achieve a minimum distance of six feet (6 ft) between parties; effective Thursday, November 12, tables may be placed closer than 6 feet, but only if they are separated by dividing barriers;
  • Require customers to only consume food or beverages while seated;
  • Require patrons to wear face coverings while inside the indoor premises of the food or beverage establishment, except when eating or drinking at their table;
  • For food or beverage establishments with table service, require that customers be seated in order to place orders;
  • For food or beverage establishments with table service, require that wait staff bring food or beverages to seated customers; and
  • Keep doors and windows open where possible and utilize fans to improve ventilation.
  • Per Executive Order No. 183, smoking, including vaping, is permitted indoors only when otherwise permitted by State law.
  • Effective Thursday, November 12, barside seating will prohibited at all hours.
  • Effective Thursday, November 12, all restaurants, bars, clubs, and lounges that serve food and drink must close their indoor premises for business by 10 pm each day and cannot open until at least 5 am the following day.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/15/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 39 new positive cases among County residents. Currently, 1462 County residents are now off quarantine.  

It is with great sadness today we are announcing the passing of an 86-year-old male from Ocean City, “Please accept my warmest condolences, I am deeply sorry for your loss,” said Cape May County Freeholder Jeff Pierson.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2144 including 99 deaths.  

11.15.20 covid graphs

Staying Safe at Gyms or Fitness centers

Prepare before you go

  • Use options for online reservations and check-in systems when available.
  • Look for any extra prevention practices being implemented by the facility, such as new Plexiglas barriers, staff wearing masks, and closing of shared locker room space.
  • Be prepared that locker room access may be limited to the restroom area only, prohibiting the use of shower and changing areas.

Limit activity indoors, especially group activities

  • Seek facilities with outdoor space or options for virtual classes and training sessions as much as possible.
  • Limit attendance at indoor group training sessions.  If you do attend such a session, maintain as much distance as possible between yourself and other individuals, and use masks if they do not interfere with your activity. If you need to be indoors, open windows to increase airflow throughout the space.

Use social distancing and limit physical contact

  • Maintain at least 6 feet of separation as much as possible in areas that may lead to close contact (within 6 feet) among other people, such as weight rooms, group fitness studios, pools and saunas, courts and fields, walking/running tracks, locker rooms, check-in areas, parking lots, and routes of entry and exit.
  • Don’t shake hands, give high-fives, do elbow bumps, or touch others because close contact increases the risk of acquiring COVID-19.

Take extra precautions with shared equipment

  • Ensure equipment is clean and disinfected. Wipe down machines and equipment with disinfecting wipes and use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol before using machines.
  • Do not share items that cannot be cleaned, sanitized, or disinfected between use, such as resistance bands and weightlifting belts.

Wear a mask

  • Wear a maskwhen interacting with other people to minimize the risk of transmitting the virus. 
    • Wearing masks is most important when physical distancing is difficult and when exercise type and intensity allows. Consider doing any vigorous-intensity exercise outside when possible and stay at least 6 feet away from other participants, trainers, and clients if unable to wear a mask.
    • If possible, wear a mask when walking on an indoor track or when doing stretching or low-intensity forms of yoga indoors.
    • Wash your hands before adjusting your mask—review information about proper use, removal, and washing of masks.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/14/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 62 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1432 County residents are now off quarantine.  

It is with great sadness today we are announcing the passing of an 96-year old female and a 95-year old male both from Ocean City, “Wishing the families peace and comfort during this hard time,” said Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2105 including 98 deaths.  

 11.14.20 covid graphs

Staying Safe at Personal and Social Activities

What you need to know

  • · Stay home if sick.
  • · Wear masks in public settings, like on public and mass transportation, at events and gatherings, and anywhere they will be around other people.
  • · Use social distancing (stay at least 6 feet away from others).
  • · Before you go, call and ask what extra prevention strategies they are using, like requiring staff to wear masks.
  • · Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds when you get home.

Dining at a restaurant

Check the restaurant’s COVID-19 prevention practices before you go

  • · Check the restaurant’s website and social media to see if they have updated their information to address any COVID-19 safety guidelines.
  • · Before you go to the restaurant, call and ask if all staff are wearing masks while at work.
  • · Ask about options for self-parking to remove the need for a valet service.

Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from other people or indoors

Take steps to protect yourself at the restaurant

  • · Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from other people or indoors.
  • · Take precautions – like wearing a mask as much as possible when not eating and maintaining a proper social distance if you are dining with others who don’t live with you.
  • · Maintain a social distance of 6 feet or more in any entryway, hallway, or waiting area.
  • · When possible, sit outside at tables spaced at least 6 feet apart from other people.
  • · When possible, choose food and drink options that are not self-serve to limit the use of shared serving utensils, handles, buttons, or touchscreens.

Clean hands

  • · Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when entering and exiting the restaurant. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • · Before using the restroom, make sure there is enough soap and a way to dry your hands (e.g., paper towels, hand dryer), or hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.

 

Hosting gatherings or cook-outs

Remind guests to stay home if they are sick

  • · Remind invited guests to stay home if they have been exposed to COVID-19 in the last 14 days or are showing COVID-19 symptoms. Anyone who has had close contact with a person who has COVID-19 should also stay home and monitor their health. Invited guests who live with those at higher risk should also consider the potential risk to their loved ones.
  • · Consider keeping a list of guests who attended for potential future contact tracing needs.

Encourage social distancing

  • · Host your gathering outdoors, when possible. If this is not feasible, make sure the room or space is well-ventilated (for example, open a window).
  • · Arrange tables and chairs to allow for social distancing. People from the same household can be in groups together and don’t need to be 6 feet apart – just 6 feet away from other families.
  • · If planning activities for adults and/or kids, consider those where social distancing can be maintained, like sidewalk chalk art or frisbee.
  • · When guests arrive, minimize gestures that promote close contact. For example, don’t shake hands, do elbow bumps, or give hugs. Instead wave and verbally greet them.

Wear masks

  • · Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from people or indoors.
  • · Consider providing masks for guests or asking them to bring their own.

Clean hands often

  • · Consider providing hand sanitizer in addition to clearly marked hand washing areas.
  • · Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when entering and exiting social gatherings. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • · Make sure there is adequate soap or hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol available in the restrooms and encourage guests not to form a line at the door. Consider also providing cleaning supplies that allow guests to wipe down surfaces before they leave.
  • · Remind guests to wash their hands before serving or eating food.
  • · Use single-use hand towels or paper towels for drying hands so guests do not share a towel.

Limit the number of people handling or serving food

  • · Encourage guests to bring their own food and drinks.
  • · Limit people going in and out of the areas where food is being prepared or handled, such as in the kitchen or around the grill, if possible.
  • · If serving any food, consider identifying one person to serve all food so that multiple people are not handling the serving utensils.
  • · Use single-use options or identify one person to serve sharable items, like salad dressings, food containers, and condiments, so that multiple people are not handling the items.

Limit contact with commonly touched surfaces or shared items

  • · Use touchless garbage cans or pails.
  • · Use gloves when removing garbage bags or handling and disposing of trash. Wash hands after removing gloves.
  • · Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces and any shared items between use when feasible.
  • · If you choose to use any shared items that are reusable (e.g., seating covers, tablecloths, linen napkins), wash, clean, and sanitize them after the event. 

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/13/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 62 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1432 County residents are now off quarantine.  

It is with great sadness today we are announcing the passing of an 96-year old female and a 95-year old male both from Ocean City, “Wishing the families peace and comfort during this hard time,” said Freeholder Director Gerald Thornton.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 2105 including 98 deaths.  

 11.14.20 covid graphs

Staying Safe at Personal and Social Activities

What you need to know

  • · Stay home if sick.
  • · Wear masks in public settings, like on public and mass transportation, at events and gatherings, and anywhere they will be around other people.
  • · Use social distancing (stay at least 6 feet away from others).
  • · Before you go, call and ask what extra prevention strategies they are using, like requiring staff to wear masks.
  • · Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds when you get home.

Dining at a restaurant

Check the restaurant’s COVID-19 prevention practices before you go

  • · Check the restaurant’s website and social media to see if they have updated their information to address any COVID-19 safety guidelines.
  • · Before you go to the restaurant, call and ask if all staff are wearing masks while at work.
  • · Ask about options for self-parking to remove the need for a valet service.

Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from other people or indoors

Take steps to protect yourself at the restaurant

  • · Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from other people or indoors.
  • · Take precautions – like wearing a mask as much as possible when not eating and maintaining a proper social distance if you are dining with others who don’t live with you.
  • · Maintain a social distance of 6 feet or more in any entryway, hallway, or waiting area.
  • · When possible, sit outside at tables spaced at least 6 feet apart from other people.
  • · When possible, choose food and drink options that are not self-serve to limit the use of shared serving utensils, handles, buttons, or touchscreens.

Clean hands

  • · Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when entering and exiting the restaurant. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • · Before using the restroom, make sure there is enough soap and a way to dry your hands (e.g., paper towels, hand dryer), or hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.

 

Hosting gatherings or cook-outs

Remind guests to stay home if they are sick

  • · Remind invited guests to stay home if they have been exposed to COVID-19 in the last 14 days or are showing COVID-19 symptoms. Anyone who has had close contact with a person who has COVID-19 should also stay home and monitor their health. Invited guests who live with those at higher risk should also consider the potential risk to their loved ones.
  • · Consider keeping a list of guests who attended for potential future contact tracing needs.

Encourage social distancing

  • · Host your gathering outdoors, when possible. If this is not feasible, make sure the room or space is well-ventilated (for example, open a window).
  • · Arrange tables and chairs to allow for social distancing. People from the same household can be in groups together and don’t need to be 6 feet apart – just 6 feet away from other families.
  • · If planning activities for adults and/or kids, consider those where social distancing can be maintained, like sidewalk chalk art or frisbee.
  • · When guests arrive, minimize gestures that promote close contact. For example, don’t shake hands, do elbow bumps, or give hugs. Instead wave and verbally greet them.

Wear masks

  • · Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from people or indoors.
  • · Consider providing masks for guests or asking them to bring their own.

Clean hands often

  • · Consider providing hand sanitizer in addition to clearly marked hand washing areas.
  • · Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when entering and exiting social gatherings. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • · Make sure there is adequate soap or hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol available in the restrooms and encourage guests not to form a line at the door. Consider also providing cleaning supplies that allow guests to wipe down surfaces before they leave.
  • · Remind guests to wash their hands before serving or eating food.
  • · Use single-use hand towels or paper towels for drying hands so guests do not share a towel.

Limit the number of people handling or serving food

  • · Encourage guests to bring their own food and drinks.
  • · Limit people going in and out of the areas where food is being prepared or handled, such as in the kitchen or around the grill, if possible.
  • · If serving any food, consider identifying one person to serve all food so that multiple people are not handling the serving utensils.
  • · Use single-use options or identify one person to serve sharable items, like salad dressings, food containers, and condiments, so that multiple people are not handling the items.

Limit contact with commonly touched surfaces or shared items

  • · Use touchless garbage cans or pails.
  • · Use gloves when removing garbage bags or handling and disposing of trash. Wash hands after removing gloves.
  • · Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces and any shared items between use when feasible.
  • · If you choose to use any shared items that are reusable (e.g., seating covers, tablecloths, linen napkins), wash, clean, and sanitize them after the event. 

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/12/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 41 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1390 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1991 including 96 deaths.  

11.12.20 covid graphs

Before You Travel

Before you travel, consider the following:

  • Is COVID-19 spreading at your destination?
     The more cases at your destination, the more likely you are to get infected during travel and spread the virus to others when you return.
  • Check Each State’s Cases in the Last 7 Days
  • Travel Recommendations for Destinations Around the World
  • Do you live with someone who might be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19?
    If you get infected while traveling, you can spread the virus to loved ones when you return, even if you don’t have symptoms
  • Are you at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19?
     
    Anyone can get very ill from the virus that causes COVID-19, but older adults and people of any age with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Does your destination have requirements or restrictions for travelers?
    Some state, local, and territorial governments have requirements, such as requiring people to wear masks and requiring those who recently traveled to stay home for up to 14 days. Check state, territorial,tribal and local public health websites for information before you travel. If you are traveling internationally, check the destination’s Office of Foreign Affairs or Ministry of Health or the US Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Country Information for details about entry requirements and restrictions for arriving travelers, such as mandatory testing or quarantine.

If You Travel

During your trip, take steps to protect yourself and others from COVID-19:

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/11/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 39 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1373 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1950 including 96 deaths.  

11.11.20 covid graphs

General considerations for fall and winter holidays

Fall and winter celebrations, such as Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Halloween, Día de los Muertos, Navratri, Diwali, Thanksgiving, Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas, and New Year’s, typically include large gatherings of families and friends, crowded parties, and travel that may put people at increased risk for COVID-19.

Before you celebrate

Hosting a holiday gathering

If you will be hosting a celebration, follow CDC tips for hosting gatherings. Below are some additional considerations for hosting a holiday celebration:

  • Host outdoor activities rather than indoor activities as much as possible. If hosting an outdoor event is not possible, and you choose to host an indoor event, avoid crowded, poorly ventilated, or fully enclosed indoor spaces. 
    • Increase ventilation by opening windows and doors to the extent that is safe and feasible based on the weather.
  • Host activities with only people from your local area as much as possible.
  • Limit numbers of attendees as much as possible.
  • Provide updated information to your guests about any COVID-19 safety guidelines and steps in place to prevent the spread of the virus.
  • Provide or encourage attendees to bring supplies to help you and others stay healthy. For example, extra masks (do not share or swap with others), hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, and tissues.
  • If you are planning in-person holiday gatherings with people outside of your household, consider asking all guests to strictly avoid contact with people outside of their households for 14 days before the gathering.

Attending a holiday gathering

If you will be attending a celebration that someone else is hosting, follow CDC Considerations for attending an event or gathering. Below are some additional considerations for attending an in-person holiday gathering:

  • Outdoor activities are safer than indoor activities. If participating in an outdoor event is not possible, and you choose to attend an indoor event, avoid crowded, poorly ventilated, and fully enclosed indoor spaces. Increase ventilation by opening windows and doors to the extent that is safe and feasible based on the weather.
  • Check with the event host, organizer, or event venue for updated information about any COVID-19 safety guidelines and if they have steps in place to prevent the spread of the virus.
  • Bring supplies to help you and others stay healthy. For example, bring extra masks (do not share or swap with others), hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, and tissues.
  • If you are planning to attend in-person holiday gatherings with people outside of your household, consider strictly avoiding contact with people outside of your household for 14 days before the gathering.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/10/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 30 new positive cases among County residents. Additionally, there are 3 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.  Currently, 1354 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1911 including 96 deaths.  

 11.10.20 covid graphs

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/9/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 30 new positive cases among County residents. Additionally, there are 4 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.  Currently, 1321 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1881 including 96 deaths.  

11.9.20 covid graphs

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is a time when many families travel long distances to celebrate together. Travel increases the chance of getting and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. If you must travel, be informed of the risks involved.

Lower risk activities

  • Having a small dinner with only people who live in your household
  • Preparing traditional family recipes for family and neighbors, especially those at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and delivering them in a way that doesn’t involve contact with others
  • Having a virtual dinner and sharing recipes with friends and family
  • Shopping online rather than in person on the day after Thanksgiving or the next Monday
  • Watching sports events, parades, and movies from home

Moderate risk activities

  • Having a small outdoor dinnerwith family and friends who live in your community 
  • Visiting pumpkin patches or orchards where people use hand sanitizer before touching pumpkins or picking apples, wearing masks is encouraged or enforced, and people are able to maintain social distancing
  • Attending a small outdoor sports events with safety precautions in place

Higher risk activities

Avoid these higher risk activities to help prevent the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19:

  • Going shopping in crowded stores just before, on, or after Thanksgiving
  • Participating or being a spectator at a crowded race
  • Attending crowded parades
  • Using alcohol or drugs, which can cloud judgement and increase risky behaviors
  • Attending large indoor gatherings with people from outside of your household

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/8/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 24 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1279 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1851 including 96 deaths.  

11.8.20 covid graphs

How CDC Is Making COVID-19 Vaccine Recommendations

CDC is making coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination recommendations for the United States based on input from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). ACIP is a federal advisory committee made of up of medical and public health experts who develop recommendations on the use of vaccines in the U.S. public. ACIP holds regular meetings, which are open to the public and provide opportunity for public comment.

Since the pandemic began, ACIP has been holding special meetings to review U.S. data on COVID-19 and the vaccines in development to help prevent it. Before making recommendations, ACIP plans to review all available clinical trial information, including descriptions of

  • Who is receiving each candidate vaccine (age, race, ethnicity, underlying medical conditions)
  • How different groups respond to the vaccine
  • Side effects experienced

If the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorizes or approves a COVID-19 vaccine, ACIP will quickly hold a meeting to review all available data about that vaccine. From these data, ACIP will then vote on whether to recommend the vaccine and, if so, who should receive it. Included in ACIP’s recommendations will be guidance on who should receive COVID-19 vaccines if supply is limited. Recommendations must go to the director of CDC for approval before becoming official CDC policy.

Goals for vaccination if supply is limited

ACIP has set the following goals for deciding who to recommend COVID-19 vaccines for if supply is limited:

  • Decrease death and serious disease as much as possible
  • Preserve functioning of society
  • Reduce the extra burden the disease is having on people already facing disparities
  • Increase the chance for everyone to enjoy health and well-being

Ethical principles

ACIP is setting ethical principles to guide their decision-making process on who to recommend COVID-19 vaccines for if supply is limited. Early discussions have focused on the following five principles:

  • Maximize benefits and minimize harms — Respect and care for people using the best available data to promote public health and minimize death and serious disease.
  • Equity — Decrease health disparities and make sure everyone has a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible.
  • Justice — Treat affected groups, populations, and communities fairly. Remove unfair, unjust, and avoidable barriers to good health and well-being.
  • Fairness — Give everyone in a priority group an equal chance to get COVID-19 vaccination.
  • Transparency — Make a decision that is clear, understandable, and open for review. Allow and seek public participation in the creation and review of the decision processes.

Groups considered for early vaccination if supply is limited

ACIP is considering four groups to possibly recommend COVID-19 vaccination for if supply is limited:

  • Healthcare personnel
  • Workers in essential and critical industries
  • People at high risk for severe COVID-19 disease due to underlying medical conditions
  • People 65 years and older

Healthcare personnel continue to be on the front line of the nation’s fight against this deadly pandemic. By providing critical care to those infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, many healthcare personnel have a high risk of being exposed to and getting sick with COVID-19. Healthcare personnel who get COVID-19 are also at risk of spreading the virus to patients seeking care for medical conditions that increase their risk for severe COVID-19 disease. Early vaccine access is critical to ensuring the health and safety of this essential workforce of approximately 20 million people, protecting not only them but also their patients and the broader health of our country. Learn who is included under the broad term “healthcare personnel.”

Workers in essential and critical industries are considered part of America’s critical infrastructure, as defined by the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security . Current data show that many of these workers are at increased risk for COVID-19. Early vaccine access is critical not only to protect them but also to maintain the essential services they provide U.S. communities.

People with certain underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 disease, regardless of their age. Severe illness means that the person with COVID-19 may require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe, or that they may even die. Early vaccine access is critical to ensuring the health and safety of this population that is disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

Among adults, the risk for severe illness from COVID-19 increases with age, with older adults at highest risk. Early vaccine access is critical to help protect this population that is disproportionately affected by COVID-19.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/7/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 31 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1278 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1827 including 96 deaths.  

11.7.20 covid graphs

Reinfection with COVID-19

Cases of reinfection with COVID-19 have been reported, but remain rare.

In general, reinfection means a person was infected (got sick) once, recovered, and then later became infected again. Based on what we know from similar viruses, some reinfections are expected. We are still learning more about COVID-19. Ongoing COVID-19 studies will help us understand:

  • How likely is reinfection
  • How often reinfection occurs
  • How soon after the first infection can reinfection take place
  • How severe are cases of reinfection
  • Who might be at higher risk for reinfection
  • What reinfection means for a person’s immunity
  • If a person is able to spread COVID-19 to other people when reinfected

CDC is actively working to learn more about reinfection to inform public health action. CDC developed recommendations for public health professionals to help decide when and how to test someone for suspected reinfection. CDC has also provided information for state and local health departments to help investigate suspected cases of reinfection. We will update this guidance as we learn more about reinfection.

Prevention

At this time, whether you have had COVID-19 or not, the best way to prevent infection is to take steps to protect yourself:

  • Wear a mask in public places
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from other people
  • Wash your hands
  • Avoid crowds and confined spaces

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/6/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 20 new positive cases among County residents.  Currently, 1276 County residents are now off quarantine.  

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1796 including 96 deaths.  

11.6.20 covid graphs

Safety Tips for Gatherings

During this difficult time, we understand everyone wants to be with family and friends. But being cautious when you interact with others is particularly important as New Jersey is seeing increasing signs of community spread. To ensure we don't inadvertently spread COVID-19 and needlessly put our loved ones at risk, the NJ Department of Health has offered safety tips for in-person gatherings:

  • Indoor gatherings pose more risk than outdoor gatherings. Host outdoor activities rather than indoor activities as much as possible.
  • Ask guests to wear face coverings when they cannot social distance.
  • Make hand sanitizer available for guests.
  • Gatherings that last longer pose more risk than shorter gatherings.
  • Gatherings with more people pose more risk than gatherings with fewer people. Limit numbers of attendees as much as possible.
  • When hosting activities, do so with people only from your local area as much as possible. Activities with attendees traveling from different locations increase the risk of infection and spread, especially if they are coming from or traveling to a location with higher levels of COVID-19 cases and community spread.
  • Remind invited guests to stay home if they have been exposed to the virus in the last 14 days, are showing COVID-19 symptoms, or recently travelled to an area or a state with high COVID-19 infection rates.
  • Limit the number of people handling or serving food—for example, consider identifying one person to serve all food so that multiple people are not handling the serving utensils.
  • Remind guests to wash their hands before serving or eating food.
  • Use single-use hand towels or paper towels for drying hands so guests do not share a towel.
  • Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces and any shared items between use when feasible.
  • Consider keeping a list of guests who attended for potential future contract tracing needs. If you are called by a contact tracer, it's critical that you answer the call to protect us all. Your help is the key to stopping the spread of COVID-19 and saving lives.

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 11/5/20

The County of Cape May Department of Health is reporting 24 new positive cases among County residents. Additionally, there are 3 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

Currently, 1252 County residents are now off quarantine.  Sadly, today we are announcing the passing of an 89-year-old female from Upper Township. “In this sorrowful time, I would like to extend to the family my heartfelt condolences,” said Cape May County Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton.

Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1776 including 96 deaths.  

11.5.20 covid graphs

Cape May County Department of Health Announces it’s Free Flu Clinic Schedule  

The Cape May County Health Department is strongly encouraging all residents to get their flu shot as soon as possible. Flu vaccination is the best way to prevent the flu and its potentially serious complications.

During seasons when the flu vaccine viruses are similar to circulating flu viruses, flu vaccine has been shown to reduce the risk of having to go to the doctor with flu by 40 percent to 60 percent.

“With this year’s flu season approaching, it is critical that adults and children get the flu vaccine to protect against infection and help prevent the spread of seasonal flu to others”, said Freeholder Jeff Pierson. “By getting a flu shot now, you will protect yourself, as well as your family and friends.”

“Influenza is a contagious virus that can spread rapidly in our communities and cause severe illness resulting in hospitalization or death”, said Kevin Thomas, Health Officer. “Getting vaccinated is the best way to avoid the flu; it reduces the spread of the virus and can also help make illnesses less severe for those who do still get sick.”

The vaccine is recommended for everyone six months and older, including pregnant women. Individuals that are at most risk for getting severely ill from the flu are young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes, heart disease or lung disease, and people aged 65 years and older. It takes approximately two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop protection against the flu. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend getting a flu vaccine every year because flu viruses evolve quickly, and last year’s vaccine may not protect against the current year’s strain. Even if the vaccine does not fully protect against the flu, it may reduce the severity of symptoms and the risk of complications.

Where to get the flu shot

Most pharmacies and doctors’ offices are offering the flu shot and due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Health Department will be offering the flu vaccine by appointment only at the following locations:

 

Family Flu Vaccine Clinics: Children 6 months and older and their families. Appointment Only 

 

Date:        November 7, 2020

Time:       By Appointment- Call (609) 465-1187

Location: Holly Beach Fire Department

                 103 W Montgomery Ave,

                 Wildwood, NJ 08260

All flu clinics are by appointment only and will require a completed consent form. Masks must also be worn to receive a flu vaccine. High dose vaccine will be offered as supplies last. Please request high dose when making your appointment. To make an appointment call (609) 465-1187. For consent forms and more information on upcoming flu clinics, visit www.cmchealth.net  - Click Seasonal Flu. Also, like us on Facebook for updated information. 

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.